I think everyone reading Hook Life has at the very least heard about the free fall suspensions that have been taking place with the Sinner Team in Russia. In an attempt to take body suspension a step further, they have begun a new form of suspending that, love it or hate it, is gaining a lot of attention. The idea seems simple enough; rather than being lifted by the hooks in their skin they are setting up to make it possible for them to jump from some startling high structures, and then glide into a huge swing from the ropes and pulleys supporting the suspendee. As with anything we do, just because it sounds like an easy idea doesn’t mean that it is. In a previous article, Allen Falkner took the time to show the mathematics that must be taken into account to keep this from living up to its name as a ‘Death Swing’. With their full movie presentation being released in a few days at the Oslo Suscon, I think it could be a great time to discuss this idea and the concerns that many people in the suspension community have voiced about it.

A few things I would like everyone to keep in mind: many of us are very passionate when it comes to body suspension and it can often lead to heated conversations when we disagree,  please try to say what you like in a polite manner to one another. This is not an open forum to bash or be hateful towards each other or any teams, it is a chance for us to learn about something new that is happening in our community. And lastly I would like to say for those of you who are not a fan of the free fall suspensions, from what I know the Sinner Team has been very receptive of advice and critiques that have allowed them to improve and be safer in what they do. To me, the ability to take criticism or negative feedback and turn it into something positive to build upon says a lot about their team and their professionalism. With that said, how do you feel about Free Fall Suspensions?

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